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terms used in bridge was NMF

#1 User is offline   cooee 

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Posted 2004-January-28, 19:31

Thank you all for your interest and help regarding my question about NMF.
I have read more on the topic now and I have learnt a lot about NMF.I have found a few good references to it and good answers from this forum.
It is a huge help to be able to get advice like this.
It is interesting that a lot of sites have a "glossary " of bridge terms but sometimes things are not on the list. This can sometimes be because it is obvious in the country that the site was written but not so obvious to people from other countries.
One point is the term "diamond bust ". It has taken me ages to find out what this means and I have only just found out ( I think ).I could find no explaination for it but the term is used all the time
Now that I have somewhere to ask questions I will take full advantage of it <G>
Thanks again to everyone who took the time to answer

Cooee
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#2 User is offline   Trpltrbl 

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Posted 2004-January-28, 20:43

cooee, on Jan 28 2004, 08:31 PM, said:

Thank you all for your interest and help regarding my question about NMF.
I have read more on the topic now and I have learnt a lot about NMF.I have found a few good references to it and good answers from this forum.
It is a huge help to be able to get advice like this.
It is interesting that a lot of sites have a "glossary " of bridge terms but sometimes things are not on the list. This can sometimes be because it is obvious in the country that the site was written but not so obvious to people from other countries.
One point is the term "diamond bust ". It has taken me ages to find out what this means and I have only just found out ( I think ).I could find no explaination for it but the term is used all the time
Now that I have somewhere to ask questions I will take full advantage of it <G>
Thanks again to everyone who took the time to answer

Cooee

Diamond Bust or any other suit bust means that you are void in that suit.

Mike :D
If there is dissatisfaction with the status quo, good. If there is ferment,
so much the better. If there is restlessness, I am pleased. Then let there
be ideas, and hard thought, and hard work.
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#3 User is offline   the hog 

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Posted 2004-January-28, 20:47

Ah, no Mike!

Diamond bust refers to a 1D response, which shows a weak, hand to a 1C opening bid .

In Precision the 1D bid shows 0-7 HCP
In Polish Club it shows 0-6. (or a variety of mid range or even very strong hands)
- hence the term bust

You will find some players, generally pretty weak ones, play systems like short Club, D bust. They are not playing Precision, but their response to 1C is Precision like; it shows a weak hand.

Hope this helps.
"The King of Hearts a broadsword bears, the Queen of Hearts a rose." W. H. Auden.
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#4 User is offline   Trpltrbl 

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Posted 2004-January-28, 20:51

Hehehe, I guess you are right :D

Mike :D
If there is dissatisfaction with the status quo, good. If there is ferment,
so much the better. If there is restlessness, I am pleased. Then let there
be ideas, and hard thought, and hard work.
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#5 User is offline   irdoz 

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Posted 2004-January-28, 22:15

And I've always understood 'diamond bust' or 'club bust' slightly differently.

Bust means a hand thats broke or a poor hand (no disagreement there).

Rather than a diamond bust being a 1d negative I've always understood 'diamond bust' to mean a poor hand with diamonds or 'club bust' a poor hand with clubs...but it wouldn't surprise me if hog is right.
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#6 User is offline   inquiry 

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Posted 2004-January-29, 10:16

I think "diamond bust" is a very weak hand with a lot of diamonds.... as suggested by irdoz

For me precision 1-1 or standard american 2-2 where the bid shows a negative hand, should be a negative response, "bust hand," or "diamond negative" not a "diamond bust". But one thing we call all agree on a diamond bust is a bad hand... :rolleyes:

Ben

PS to Cooee... feel free to come and ask questions, you will get plenty of answers, most of which do not agree with each other, but then that is part of what makes bridge fun, there ARE not right answers for even the simpliest of questions, only differences in point of view.
--Ben--

#7 User is offline   Cave_Draco 

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Posted 2004-January-29, 19:12

I recommend http://bridgeguys.co...bridgemain.html there are errors but, if you find one, talk to them I have found them to be friendly, :rolleyes: .
"I know that there is only one power worth having. That is the power, not to take, but to accept; not to have, but to give."
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#8 User is offline   cooee 

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Posted 2004-January-29, 22:59

inquiry, on Jan 29 2004, 11:16 AM, said:

I think "diamond bust" is a very weak hand with a lot of diamonds.... as suggested by irdoz
Ben

PS to Cooee... feel free to come and ask questions, you will get plenty of answers, most of which do not agree with each other, but then that is part of what makes bridge fun, there ARE not right answers for even the simpliest of questions, only differences in point of view.

Thanks Ben.
By the way I am really confused now about Diamond Bust but that is not a problem as I can live without it <VBG>
Well here is another one<G>
When I read about carding and it says
"Signal to partner's lead: Attitude "
I am familiar with the word attitude but for the life of me I cant work out what they mean by the above statement on signals.
Thanks
Cooee
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#9 User is offline   the hog 

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Posted 2004-January-29, 23:45

Actually I checked - my definition of D bust is correct. It may be that the term has a slightly different connotation in America, though I doubt it.

Attitude means whether or not you like the suit partner has led. Very simply for example, you hold A92 and your partner leads the K. You would play the 9 here as you like pd's lead. Otoh if you held 972, you would play the 2, as you don't like the lead much.

One thing you may also see is UDCA. This stands for upside down count and attitude - so instead of playing the 9 to encourage from A92, you play the 2 - upside down from what is normal. In the second example from 972, you play the 9 - again upside down from what is normal.
The same thing applies when you are giving count, that is showing how many cards in a suit you have; normally high low shows an even number. In UDCA, high low would show an odd number. Confusing, huh!

Cheers
Ron
"The King of Hearts a broadsword bears, the Queen of Hearts a rose." W. H. Auden.
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#10 User is offline   luke warm 

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Posted 2004-January-30, 06:04

i think "diamond bust" usually means a hand that is weak with diamonds... the kind you'd use garbage stayman over, for example, with short clubs.. or something with leb, 1nt (2h) 2nt (p) 3c (p) 3d
"Paul Krugman is a stupid person's idea of what a smart person sounds like." Newt Gingrich (paraphrased)
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#11 User is offline   inquiry 

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Posted 2004-January-30, 07:36

When I read about carding and it says
"Signal to partner's lead: Attitude "
I am familiar with the word attitude but for the life of me I cant work out what they mean by the above statement on signals.


For the most part, there are three types of signals used on defense....

Attitude
Count
Suit preference

What "Signal to partner's lead: Attitude" means is that when your partner leads a suit, any card you play that is not an attempt to win the trick (thus generally a spot card) is an attitude signal. Which is often referred to as a Come-on signal. What this means in standard carding is that a high card by your partner means "I like this suit, lead it again", and a low card means "I don't like this suit".

Some people play count signals instead (high low with doubleton or any even number, and low-high with odd). Again, one could play upside down count.

Then there is suit preference signals, where if your partner plays a high card, he want a switch to a higher suit, and if he plays a low card, a switch to a lower suit.

There are other signals, and other ways of signalling as well. For instance, the obvious switch principle, roman signals, etc. But this is what "signal to partner's lead: attitude" means.

For more on defense signals, you may want to see the following thread, entitled "A beginner's guide to signalling and giving count" started by Laird.

http://bridgebase.lunarpages.com/~bridge2/...575&hl=attitude or the following thread entitled "signalling" started by Orla

http://bridgebase.lunarpages.com/~bridge2/...142&hl=attitude
--Ben--

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