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RIP Memoriam thread?

#861 User is offline   thepossum 

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Posted 2022-March-05, 03:03

View Postpaulg, on 2022-March-04, 10:06, said:

Two legends of the game, from different eras.

Rod Marsh


Shane Warne


I'm starting to feel old as an English born person having to live through two whole eras like that. There will never be another one though. How could there be
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#862 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-March-07, 13:32

Walter Mears

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Mr. Mears became “moderately famous,” as he put it, thanks to “The Boys on the Bus,” written by the journalist Timothy Crouse. For an American public that had largely accepted the omniscient posture of mainstream political reporters, the book provided a messy but savory view of journalistic sausage making.

Mr. Crouse quoted Mr. Mears, then only 37, calling himself an “old fart” and fretting that practitioners of the ascendant style of New Journalism had skipped over essentials of reportorial training, like “how to write an eight-car fatal on Route 128.”

Yet Mr. Crouse’s description of reporters covering a debate between George McGovern and Hubert Humphrey during the Democratic primary race showed how much Mr. Mears’s colleagues respected him.

As other journalists treated the occasion like a social event, Mr. Crouse wrote, Mr. Mears typed “like a madman,” writing for as long as an hour without pause, transcribing each politician’s statements while inserting a descriptive phrase every four or five lines. Then the debate ended, and Mr. Mears’s fellow reporters began crowding around him, shouting “Lead? Lead?” and “Walter, Walter, what’s our lead?”

The “lead” — in a straight news article, the opening line that distills its significance — was Mr. Mears’s specialty. Half the men in the press room wound up copying his approach to the debate.

It was a memorable scene, and, in several “Doonesbury” comics that named Mr. Mears in the years after “The Boys on the Bus,” he was presented in the same light — as an archetypal just-the-facts-ma’am reporter.

In his memoir, Mr. Mears formulated his own description of his job: “to get past the managers and spinners to assess the strengths the candidates claim as well as the failures and flaws they try to conceal.”

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The afternoon before he died, Susan Mears said, his daughters were keeping him company, along with a Methodist pastor who had long known him. The pastor, describing Mr. Mears’s expertise in American politics, recalled a conversation many years earlier during which he had been amazed at how much Mr. Mears knew about the 1936 presidential election, which took place when he was 1 year old.

As Mr. Mears appeared to sleep, the pastor tried to remember the name of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Republican challenger.

Before either of the Mears daughters had a chance to reply, they heard a familiar voice — softer and slower than they were accustomed to, but with the speed, authoritative tone and factual command that had for decades guided America’s leading political reporters.

“Alf Landon,” Mr. Mears said.

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#863 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-March-09, 11:17

Maggy Hurchalla
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#864 User is offline   pilowsky 

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Posted 2022-March-24, 00:48

Madeleine Albright - CNN obit.
Who also taught dance to the representative from Botswana at the UN.
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek; les règles sont le jeu même.
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#865 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-March-30, 07:31

Joan Joyce

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On a warm August night in 1961, Ted Williams, the “Splendid Splinter” who had finished his Hall of Fame baseball career the year before as the last hitter to bat .400 in a single season, strode to the plate before an overflow crowd at Municipal Stadium in Waterbury, Conn., to face a young softball pitching phenom by the name of Joan Joyce.

The occasion was a charity fund-raising exhibition. Williams was in his Boston Red Sox uniform, No. 9. Joyce stood on the mound 40 feet away (regulation in women’s softball, as opposed to 60 feet 6 inches in major-league baseball), clad in the red-and-white jersey and shorts she wore as the premier pitcher for the Raybestos Brakettes, one of the top teams in the women’s game, with its home field 30 miles to the south in suburban Stratford, Conn.

Posted ImageJoan Joyce pitching in the Women’s Softball World Championship in 1974 in Stratford, Conn. With her leading the way, her Raybestos Brakettes became the first United States team to win the title. Credit...Joan Chandler

It was one of several such exhibitions in which Williams and Joyce faced off in the early 1960s, but the one in Waterbury — Joyce’s hometown, where the fans were chanting “Joanie, Joanie Joanie!” — proved to be the most memorable. It would become an oft-told tale in the lore that enveloped Joyce over her long career as, many would say, the most dominant player in the history of women’s fast-pitch softball and — given her prowess in basketball, volleyball and golf as well — as one of the greatest female athletes of her generation.

With a slingshot-like underhanded delivery, Joyce, a couple of weeks shy of her 21st birthday, took her full arsenal of blazing pitches to the mound that night: curveballs, sliders, fastballs and her trademark “drop ball,” which sunk over the plate. And while she warmed up, Williams, who was approaching 43 but coming off a sterling, age-defying final season in Boston (hitting .316 and swatting 29 home runs), studied the movement of her ball.

To no avail, as it turned out.

For 10 to 15 minutes, Williams, a left-handed hitter, swung at and missed almost everything Joyce, a right-hander, threw at him (save for a couple of foul tips).

“Finally,” Joyce later recalled, “he threw the bat down and said, ‘I can’t hit her’” and walked away.

Mighty Williams had struck out.

Years later, Joyce would tell her biographer, Tony Renzoni, how she once met a man who had fished with Williams off the Florida Keys. The man told her that he had asked Williams to name the toughest pitcher he had ever faced. “And he said,” she recalled, “‘You won’t believe this, but it was a teenage girl.’”

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#866 User is offline   sfi 

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Posted 2022-April-10, 19:48

Chris Bailey, singer and leader of the seminal punk band The Saints, passed away two days ago.

For your listening pleasure, their first single.
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#867 User is offline   Lovera 

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Posted 2022-April-11, 12:54

I was reading Switzerland wins (in Bridge d'Italia Online) when i read:"Unfortunately, these memories must be tinged with a sad note: just a few days ago Edwin Kantar, one of the greatest players of all time, who was the protagonist in both finals that I mentioned above, passed away. Kantar was also a great writer and teacher, and we all learned a lot from him. Goodbye Eddie, we will meet again at some table of the great afterlife tournaments."
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#868 User is offline   pilowsky 

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Posted 2022-April-12, 16:26

Gilbert Gottfried - too soon.
non est deus ex machina; även maskiner behöver lite kärlek; les règles sont le jeu même.
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#869 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-May-01, 20:26

Kathy Boudin
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#870 User is offline   kenberg 

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Posted 2022-May-02, 07:07

View Posty66, on 2022-May-01, 20:26, said:



I thank you for this.
This is not the right thread for a long discussion of her life but I read the article with great interest. I'm 83, she was about to turn 79, we were very different.
Best to leave it at that.
Thanks again.
Ken
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#871 User is offline   thepossum 

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Posted 2022-May-03, 02:39

View Postsfi, on 2022-April-10, 19:48, said:

Chris Bailey, singer and leader of the seminal punk band The Saints, passed away two days ago.

For your listening pleasure, their first single.


Thx for posting this. Couldn't be a more appropriate song (or singer/writer/band) for how I feel at home in Brisbane or overseas away from Brisbane

Sad I missed the news
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#872 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-May-24, 14:59

Dervla Murphy

From Rose Baring's description of her visit to Murphy's home in Lismore, County Waterford, Ireland in 2018:

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Dervla Murphy’s home is at once the most hospitable and the most inhospitable of places. As you would expect of a woman who has made a living from talking with anyone and everyone around the globe – and writing about it – good conversation, and friends, are plentiful. In summer there’s a table in the cobbled courtyard, hewn from a single tree trunk. Alcohol lubricates and conversation gambols from one topic to the next late into the warm, light night – the Catholic Church, events in Israel/Palestine, animal behaviour, news of mutual friends. In winter, things move indoors, where a small fire tries valiantly to heat a building to which the concept of insulation is a stranger. Only the conviviality is warm.

Dervla is oblivious to the cold. She sleeps in a converted cowshed, and eats one meal a day, at 5.30am. Homemade muesli and yoghurt gives way to home-baked bread and cheese, or sometimes sausages. From midday, the only sustenance is beer. Guests are housed in the pigsty, where the only gadget in the house, an electric blanket, has recently made an appearance. Before that, it was a question of piling on all available bedding and praying that the damp would be gone after a couple of nights. Never have I appreciated the charms of my perennially warm husband more. In the evening, guests are fed delicious stews while Dervla downs another pint. For a woman who shows so little interest in eating, she’s a very good cook.

There’s something reassuring about someone who lives as they write. In her books, Dervla is never bothered by where she will sleep at night, or what she will eat. What she cares about is what a place is like, why, and what the people there think and feel about it. How many eighty-year-olds do you know who would happily spend three months in a refugee camp, living in a single concrete room with a hole in one corner as a loo? For her, understanding the experience of the Palestinians in Balata Camp was her duty as a fellow human. Nothing in the world would make me want to change that, for out of it has come some of the most exhilarating and honest travel writing of the century. But I would sometimes like a bit more heat.

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#873 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-May-30, 05:18

Sgt. Nicole Gee and Sgt. Johanny Rosario Pichardo, two Marines killed while helping evacuate Kabul last year.
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#874 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-June-10, 08:00

Sean Thackrey
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#875 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2022-June-28, 16:09

Deborah James, somebody who raised millions of pounds and will have saved a lot of lives by doing a podcast on having cancer. 2 of the 3 presenters now gone.

https://en.wikipedia...mes_(journalist)

Her fund I believe stands at something like £7M and will no doubt explode now she's died
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#876 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-June-30, 20:40

Sonny Barger, Face of the Hells Angels said:

One of the things that has always amazed me about reporters during my whole life, 99 percent of them will say, ‘Gee, after talking to you I find that you’re halfway intelligent. You could have been anything you wanted to be!’ They don’t realize, I am what I want to be.

https://www.nytimes....lls-angels.html

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#877 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-July-26, 06:36

Diana Kennedy
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#878 User is offline   Winstonm 

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Posted 2022-July-26, 06:39

Paul Sorvino
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." Black Lives Matter. / "I need ammunition, not a ride." Zelensky
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#879 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2022-July-28, 10:49

James Lovelock
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again -- Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#880 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2022-July-31, 14:07

Nichelle Nichols https://en.wikipedia...ichelle_Nichols
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